Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Grow Your Daily Medicine in the Backyard with Parsley Tea

People are more aware of parsley being used in sauces, garnishing and flavorings of food. And some even use it as a fresh salad ingredient because of its delicate taste. But what most people fail to know is that it is also a wonderful medical herb that can help treat a number of ailments.

Parsley Tea is easily prepared by chopping of the leaves from the stem and place it directly into a tea pot with clean water, and then boil for 5-10 minutes.

Parsley Tea is easily prepared by chopping of the leaves from the stem and place it directly into a tea pot with clean water, and then boil for 5-10 minutes.

The major properties of parsley have the ability to act as antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant cleansing the body from within. It has been proven to be a healthy treatment for anemia, bladder infection, bad breath, kidney issues, digestive problems, anti-arthritis, indigestion, blood infection and many more. Some people even say that parsley is an aphrodisiac.

What Makes Parsley Effective?

According to Live Strong, the leaf of Parsley is rich in vitamins A and C, and also in mineral iron and sulfur. The nutrient with highest quantity found in the leaf is Vitamin K. Vitamin K is extremely important for a healthy cardiovascular system and right bone density.  The best way on how to make healthy parsley tea recipe is with the use of fresh leaves because it retains the most nutrients as compared to using dried leaves.

Health Benefits of Parsley Tea

Parsley tea health benefits for period is one of the most common uses of this type of tea because it induces the start of a woman`s menstrual flow, as stated in the Web MD. Some people even ask, Can parsley leaf tea cause spontaneous abortion or miscarriage?” The answer is yes. When menstrual flow is induced, it affects the hold of the embryo or fetus on the womb of the mother therefore causing abortion, on purpose or not.

A report in Natural News said that herbalists like Dr. John R. Christopher have been successfully using parsley in a number of ways for herbal treatments for kidneys, joint problems, nerves, bladder issues and many more.

Is parsley tea good for gout? Well, gout is a joint problem affecting mostly old people due to age and health complications, but the same case have been observed for younger ones. The calming effect of parsley on the nerves and blood streams makes it an effective remedy for gout.

Simple Parsley Tea Recipe

Master herbalists and experts suggest that you start with fresh parsley leaves boiled in water. At least two quarts of a strong parsley tea is recommended each day for adrenal glands and nerve issues. Some are even advised to take a cup every hour for better results. Boiled leaves may be taken throughout the day as long as it is covered well and reheated from time to time.

Watch this video on How to Make Parsley Tea

The post Grow Your Daily Medicine in the Backyard with Parsley Tea appeared first on Parsley Tea -.

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Holy Basil Tea Makes You Stress-Free and Away from Other Illness

Ocimum sanctum, or Holy basil, is from the family of mints known as Labiatae. Its close relatives are frequently used for cooking, but holy basil is much more diverse than just a food ingredient.

Holy basil is a native plant from Asia and is also common in tropical parts of the world. It has been used and grown in India for over 3,000 years already before it recently gained popularity in the U.S.

Tulsi holy basil not only soothes the body, but also the mind and spirit by reducing the stress one person is feeling. Experts believe that it promotes some anti-cancer properties in the long run of intake.

Tulsi holy basil not only soothes the body, but also the mind and spirit by reducing the stress one person is feeling. Experts believe that it promotes some anti-cancer properties in the long run of intake.

Holy basil is also famously known as “Tulsi” in India, or directly translated to “The Incomparable One”, as stated in the article of Medicine Hunter. It is considered as the most sacred plant in the country as they believe that Tulsi symbolizes their goddess Lakshmi based in Hindu mythology.

Lakshmi is the wish if Vishnu and one of the most important deities of Indian religion. Aside from its mythological beliefs, it also provides health benefits for the mind, body and spirit – and this is what is holy basil tulsi tea good for.

The Health Benefits of Tulsi Holy Basil Tea

The Tulsi Holy Basil Tea Health Benefits has been observed in many parts of the body. It is known to be a powerful antioxidant showing antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory capabilities making it very useful ingredient in treating different kinds of health conditions.

It originally started as part of Ayurvedic medicine called “adaptogen” that will counteract the stresses in one person’s life, as mentioned in Web MD. They enumerated a number of treatments that can be cured with the help of holy basil such as influenza, H1N1 flu, asthma, bronchitis, common cold, diabetes, stress, viral hepatitis, fever, heart disease, malaria, tuberculosis, headache, earache and stomach upset. Some people have also successfully used it in treating mercury poisoning, to promote longevity of one`s life, in counteracting bites from poisonous animals, and as a mosquito repellent.

Some people ask where to buy organic holy basil tea for ulcer because it is famous for its anti-ulcer properties. This works when holy basil promotes the reduction of stomach acid and production of protective mucus.

Holy Basil Tea Recipe

The answer on how to make healthy holy basil leaf tea recipe is fairly simple because all you need is some stem, leaves or roots of holy basil. Soak this plant parts on hot water for several minutes prior to intake. Experts advise at least one tea per day to maximize its long term good effects. But it is not advisable to take the tea in very huge quantities because it might create some unwanted side effects like advised on Draxe.

 Watch this video about Holy Basil Tea Recipe and its Health Benefits

The post Holy Basil Tea Makes You Stress-Free and Away from Other Illness appeared first on Holy Basil Tea.

Monday, December 21, 2015

What Makes Passion Flower Tea Special?

Passiflora incarnata, or also commonly known as Passion flower was initially discovered by Spanish Jesuits in the 17th century somewhere in Peru. They named the flower after they noticed its resemblance to the crucifixion of Jesus Christ on a cross. The Jesuits believed that Christ approved their exploration with the discovery of the flower. May be if they knew that passion flower tea for stress and anxiety, then they might even think that the flower was a miracle sent from Heaven with its benefits.

Passion Flower has been known to grow anywhere in America with most people drinking it to reduce stress, anxiety and depression. Its calming effects have already been proven by many studies making it an effective natural remedy for many illnesses.

Passion Flower has been known to grow anywhere in America with most people drinking it to reduce stress, anxiety and depression. Its calming effects have already been proven by many studies making it an effective natural remedy for many illnesses.

Passion flower is native in America from a genus of flowering vines, which family members and relative plants known and found to grows almost anywhere in the world. Some passion flowers bear an edible fruit that is called maypop, which is used as a flavoring for soft drinks and for Hawaiian Punch.

It lived up to its name for providing overflowing greatness, positivity and calmness for the mind and body. Furthermore, it has a very striking appearance with “a ring of flat violet-colored petals beneath an inner ring of darker tendril-like petals”, as described in a report by SF Gate.

Benefits of Passion Flower for the Mind and Body

If people are aware of the healthy organic passion flower tea benefits and where to buy them, then they would not have issues of getting healthy and well for both mind and body as it is relatively easy to prepare a simple tea.

It was initially used in Europe to treat agitation, indigestion, seizures and restlessness. But it is now popular as an anxiety treatment.

The Web MD reported that passion flower is used for treating gastrointestinal (GI) upset, anxiety or nervousness, insomnia, general anxiety disorder (GAD), seizures, symptoms of menopause, irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure, fibromyalgia, relieving pain, hysteria, and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

It works by boosting the release of a chemical known as GABA in the brain that lowers it activity, thus produces a calming effect.

Organic Passion Flower Tea

Healthy passion flower tea recipe benefits many people who prefer to have their drink made at home or personally created for assurance that they get the most out of the flower itself. Experts always say that “the best way to take passion flower is through tea”, as said in Healthline.

The recipe is relatively easy to make as you only need some dried passion flower leaves, tincture or extract. See the dosage indicated in the label for tincture and extracts because too much passion flower can produce a sedative effect. It was advised in NYU Langone Medical Center that a passion flower tea should need up to one teaspoon of dried leaves, or teabag, for one cup of warm/hot water that will be soaked or 10 to 15 minutes prior to intake.

This is how to make the best organic passion flower tea and take note that it is already known to be safe and effective. However, the effect on children and pregnant women is still yet to be approved.

Watch this video about passion flower tea benefits

The post What Makes Passion Flower Tea Special? appeared first on Passion Tea.

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Amazing Health Benefits of Bitter Melon Tea

Bitter melon tea has been used in Asian traditional medicines for treating diabetes since a long time, since this sort of melon lowers blood sugar level, cholesterol and is even used as a prophylactic against cancer.

Our readers often ask us about green bitter melon tea recipe and its health benefits which we’ll discuss below.

About Bitter Melon

Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a mine of vitamins and iron, widespread in China, India and South America. This elongated vegetable has a bitter taste when fully ripe, so only immature fruits are usually used for food.

Its juice is poisonous, but helps from helminths, arthritis, skin diseases, diabetes, asthma and rheumatism, it causes increased appetite and improves digestion.bitter melon tea

Bitter melon is much more useful than many vegetables. For example, it contains twice as much beta-carotene, calcium and potassium as broccoli, spinach, and bananas.

Bitter Melon Tea against Diabetes

Fresh juice and extract from the immature fruits of bitter melon have antidiabetic action. This was confirmed by the studies carried out on humans and animals.

During the study scientists prepared various powders and extracts from fresh and dried fruits and compared their hypoglycemic characteristics in diabetic rats. They found that an aqueous extract of fresh immature whole fruits reduced the blood glucose level by 48%. This effect is comparable with the effect of taking glibenclamide, a known synthetic drug.

Thus, bitter gourd extract powder is a safe alternative that can be used for reducing the glucose level in the blood. Furthermore, it can be concluded that the extract enhances the effect of oral hypoglycemic.

The plant contains some active antidiabetic agents. For example, scientists extracted insulin-like protein known as insulin-P or polypeptide-P, which showed hypoglycemic properties when administered subcutaneously to patients with diabetes type 1. In addition, momordica harantskaya contains harantin – a complex steroid substance, which is a powerful hypoglycemic agent.

Clinical studies have shown that taking the bitter melon extract is highly effective in reducing blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes type 2.

Learn more on health benefits of bitter melon tea bags for diabetes.

Bitter Gourd Melon Tea

Since ancient times, people have been making infusions and decoctions from all parts of the plant. Infusion of leaves are usually used for high blood pressure, colds, cough, and headache.

Leaf tea helps regulate blood sugar and it is recommended for diabetic patients. It necessary to pour  boiled water on one tea spoon of herbs, infuse for 20 minutes and take a cup of tea three times a day. The tea is rather bitter, but it is better to drink it without sweetening.

Discover the powerful benefits of bitter melon and how to make a healthy bitter gourd melon tea recipe here.

Watch this video about the health benefits of Bitter Gourd Melon Tea

Photo Source: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8678/16533882286_c5f30f028e_k.jpg


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So Healthy Valerian Root Tea: Not Just Against Insomnia

valerian root tea benefitsValerian tea is not just a tasty drink that can quench your thirst, it is also a useful product with a number of curative virtues. Valerian is a plant widely used in folk medicine. It is historically known to be one of nature’s sedatives with anti-anxiety properties, thought to relieve insomnia and migraines since the time of Hippocrates. Here we’re providing you with an amazing fact about valerian tea high and its health benefits and side effects.

Use for medicinal purposes

Valerian is used to treat insomnia and other disorders as an alternative to benzodiazepine drugs. It is a sedative that is used for nervous tension, hysteria, excitability, stress and intestinal colic or cramps.

Valerian is also traditionally used to treat abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome. It is often used as a transitional remedy during cessation from benzodiazepine usage.

In folk medicine, valerian is used in the form of infusions, decoctions, extracts and powders. Medical recommend infusion of valerian roots during menopause and after an illness as a general tonic.

In ancient times valerian was used as an aphrodisiac. The Egyptian queen Cleopatra ordered to scatter valerian herbs around her luxurious bed.

In the US, valerian is used in the manufacturing of essences, liqueurs, bitters. It also added as a flavor to Havana cigars and Turkish tobacco. As a spice valerian is used mainly in European countries. In England, they add fresh leaves of valerian to salads.

Some herbalists even say that you don’t have to take it by mouth it’s enough to breath in valerian dust to have the same effect.

Side Effects

Like any other herb, valerian and valerian tea may have counterindication. The most common side effect of valerian tea is idiosyncrasy. Valerian root tea should not be taken by women who are pregnant or breast-feeding and children under 3 years old.

It is not recommended to drink valerian tea more than 1.5 months, as it may disrupt the digestive system and cause nausea. In addition, headaches, disturbance of the cardiovascular system, anxiety are possible.

Valerian Root Tea

Today valerian root is sold as a dietary supplement in any form, however, the most convenient is tea. More on valerian tea bags and its benefits for anxiety here.

Valerian roots are the most curative part of the plant. They are harvested in August – October: dug, thoroughly washed, cured within 2-3 days and then finally dried at 40°C.

Valerian is one of the most important medicinal plants. That is why it very important to know how to make healthy and organic valerian tea recipe.

Here’s our valerian root tea recipe


1 tsp valerian root (approx 2 grams)

2 tsp honey

10 cups of boiling water

How to

Fill the infusion device with valerian root. Take a pot and bring 10 cups water to boil in it. As the water boils, turn your stove off and lay it on a cold burner. Put valerian to the water. Add two spoons of honey and mix it well until dissolved. Voila!

Watch this video about valerian root tea

The post So Healthy Valerian Root Tea: Not Just Against Insomnia appeared first on Valerian Root Tea.

What is Senna Tea?

Senna Leaf Tea and It’s Wonderful Benefits

The question is, what are senna leaf tea health benefits? For centuries, senna leaf has been used in making herbal teas, for purging and in managing weight loss. The components that makes senna work for these things are anthraquinone derivatives along with their glucosides that functions as a local irritant on the colon, as mentioned in Livertox. This active components promote peristalsis and evacuation of unwanted things inside the bowel.

Furthermore, it also enhances the intestinal fluid accumulation and increases the moisture content of stool by making some sort of reaction in the colon inhibiting electrolyte and water reabsorption.

Constipation Issues? Take Senna Tea

Everyone should observe if they are experiencing less than three bowel movements per week or if the stool is harder than usual. This signifies constipation, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Many factors may contribute to constipation and some are stress, chronic disease, lack of exercise, or certain medications. Some people advise senna leaf laxative tea for constipation as it readily and rapidly fixes the issue of hard and infrequent bowel movement. But go talk to a doctor first before making your own decision.

Drink Senna Tea for immediate Weight Loss

Most instant weight loss products involve the feeling frequent bowel movement making the person have the need to eject whatever is in it. This is how does senna tea work for weight loss. Thus, the body resorts to using the reserved fats, calories, proteins and carbohydrates to replenish whatever nutrients the body needs. In effect, the person loses weight immediately. But this is not advisable in the long term as experts have strongly stated that they are against long-term use of senna in whatever reason it may be.

Where to Find Organic Senna Leaf Tea

Some health food store or online stores sell the herb, or a ready to use teabag for easier preparation. This is where to buy senna tea for diet and detox. Some people drink senna tea once in a while for body detox which cleanses the body from the toxins that could result to illnesses and irregularities. The Diet Spotlight has some pretty good review of senna.

Watch this video about Senna Herb Tea Health Benefits and Side Effects

The post What is Senna Tea? appeared first on Senna Leaf Tea.

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

What Can you Get from Drinking Nettle Tea?

Nettle Tea

Stinging nettle, or Urtica dioica, is a common weed that grows almost anywhere in the world. it has been popular for a number health benefits and as a beauty regimen as well for women.

Europe and Asia are the native origins of a plant from Urtica genus, more popularly known as Stinging Nettle, and has become available worldwide already. The plant was named as such because of the fine hairs observed on its leaves and stems that release some irritating reactions when it comes in contact with human skin. But the plant has been of huge help for centuries because it was used in herbal medicine, as reported by SF Gate.

Benefits of Nettle Tea

As this plant is used in herbal medicine, practitioners from many centuries ago have enumerated a number of health benefits of stinging nettle tea such as for relieving pain from arthritis, gout, anemia and urinary problems. Moreover, it has been a popular treatment for eczema, sore muscles and irritating insect bites.

Many people have been suffering from several forms of allergy from the simplest sign of itching and sneezing. These patients usually opt for taking over-the-counter prescription antihistamines which has negative side effects like seizures, drowsiness and dry mouth. They should know that nettle leaf tea for relief of allergies has been a great alternative for people with this kind of sensitivity as it has been used in a study conducted at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine. More than half of their participants reported to have lowered allergy symptoms, and the study was reported in Live Strong.

The Nettle Leaf

As stated in an article by the Herb Wisdom, Nettle leaf contains several beneficial compounds that are biologically active meaning it functions greatly in the human body. It includes flavonoids like quercetin that is known to have antioxidant properties that removes free radicals that can damage cellular membranes and DNA. Other components of the Nettle are beta-sitosterol that is good for the heart as it lowers the absorption of dietary fats in the blood stream. These compounds make organic nettle leaf tea benefits more healthy and good for consumers.

Manage Your Facial Skin

Aside from the health benefits mentioned above with regards to drinking nettle tea, it is also famous for reducing, managing and eliminating acne issues. If you are curious about how to make organic nettle tea recipe for acne, then you should know that a lot of women have reported to have more radiant brighter and acne-free skin after drinking nettle tea.

In the recipe, you need get dry leaves or pick some fresh ones (just don’t touch the leaves directly as it could give you stinging sensation) from health food stores, buy some tincture, or pure leaf or root extracts of stinging nettle. Add a teaspoon or two of dried leaves in hot water and wait for 5 to 10 minutes before drinking it. It is advisable to add a few drops if you want to get as much extract from the leaves and root. This recipe was personally used by the blogger from Spa Finder. Just take note that nettle tea is not advisable for pregnant women and do consult your physician if you have other medications.


Watch this video about the health benefits of stinging nettle tea

The post What Can you Get from Drinking Nettle Tea? appeared first on Nettle Tea.

Monday, December 14, 2015

What is Yellow Saffron Tea – Health Benefits, How to Make and Many More!

Saffron Tea

Yellow saffron Tea has been a common drink for people the U.S. especially for those with an upset stomach as they obtain many health benefits with it and fixes that unexplainable stomach butterflies.

Yellow saffron tea is described by the name itself as it offers a yellow color once brewed. But reality is that it came from red-orange-colored saffron threads like the ones you found in the kitchen for cooking. Saffron is one of the top five most mentioned herbs, meaning it is more popular than just a kitchen herb as stated by Edgar Cayce’s A.R.E.

Saffron has been well-loved and treasured during the ancient times by diverse populations like the Egyptians, Romans and Greeks. They use it for folk medicine and a good food additive to make meals more pleasing in taste and smell.

Saffron is known to be one of the most expensive spices available on the market for its natural delicious taste and delicate aroma leaving tea drinkers wanting for more. But the main reason for its high price is the fact that it is difficult to find. Moreover, there are a number of yellow saffron tea health benefits making it more in demand than it already is.

In a study by researchers from the University of L’Aquila in Abruzzi, Italy mentioned in Livestrong, Saffron has the potential to slow down blindness as it protect vision cells, to fight against cancer because its flowers is rich in antioxidants, and lower the risk for heart disease with its flavonoids content. These are only some of the health benefits of drinking Yellow Saffron Tea observed by previous studies.

Health Benefits of Yellow Saffron Tea

According to an article published by SF Gate, the health benefits of saffron varies from helping ladies with premenstrual syndrome (PMS), “may” help treat alzheimer’s disease, enhance weight loss, and aid those suffering from depression.

Most unfamiliar with this type of tea may have heard some health benefits, but most still ask questions like – “Is saffron tea good for weight loss and PMS?”, “Does it really help treat Alzheimer’s?”, “Is it safe for pregnant women?”, and many more. Here are some conclusions generated from past studies that showed promising results:

As for PMS, a study in 2008 stated that women who take 30 milligrams of saffron per day experienced fewer PMS symptoms. They also noted that results would only be noticeable when the person has taken at least 20 cups of tea. But volunteers who participated felt positive towards the improvement of them experiencing PMS during their menstrual period.

A different study also noticed significant cognitive function improvement for those taking the same amount of saffron per day for 16 weeks as oppose to those who took placebo. This led researchers to conclude that yellow saffron tea is safe for Alzheimer’s disease patients, even in high amounts.

Shahin Akhondzadeh from Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital in the Tehran University of Medical Science was mentioned in iFood.tv as he studied the spice and showed its effectiveness in decreasing depression among patients. He made patients drink saffron and observed that they are becoming more stable as oppose to those who didn’t take the tea.

And the most favorite benefit is that it could aid in weight loss because it is present in huge quantities of polyunsaturated oils that has been established to decrease cholesterol levels in the blood.

How to Make Yellow Saffron Tea

The easiest thing to do is directly purchase yellow saffron teabags from tea shops, or you can DIY by making tea from loose saffron threads. Experts advise that it is better to make your own saffron at home if you opt for the best quality because commercial saffron teabags usually does not contain as much saffron as expected. It can readily be taken as iced-cold tea, but it is highly suggested to use water at temperature of around 180 degrees Fahrenheit to fully release the aromatic and health compounds in the tea. Find out how to make saffron tea bags with milk to ease depression.

Watch this video from Youtube to see how you can make Yellow Saffron Tea at home:

The post What is Yellow Saffron Tea – Health Benefits, How to Make and Many More! appeared first on Saffron Tea.

Thursday, November 26, 2015

29 Nettle Tea Benefits: Sipping on Nettle Tea for Better Health

Milarepa, the Tibetan saint, was said to have lived on nothing but nettles for decades of meditation. Yet another weed that most of us pull and throw out, like dandelions, nettle is a wonderful health-boosting herb that should never be dowsed with weed-killer, but plucked and dried to make into an herbal panacea that could make the local pharmacy go bankrupt. Nettle, from the flowering plant genus Urtica in the family Urticaceae, has so many health benefits, they can hardly fit into this small space.

Stinging nettle is: diuretic, astringent, pectoral, anodyne, tonic, rubefacient, styptic, anthelmintic, nutritive, hermetic, anti-rheumatic, anti-allergenic, decongestant, expectorant, anti-spasmodic, and anti-histamine, anti-lithic/lithotrophic, herpetic, galactagogue, and an anti-histamine.

29 Nettle Tea Benefits

To give you an idea of just how powerful this singular plant is, nettle has the potential to treat the following ailments:

  1. Nettle stimulates the lymph system to boost immunity
  2. Nettle relieves arthritis symptoms
  3. Nettle promotes a release from uric acid from joints
  4. Helps to support the adrenals
  5. It helps with diabetes mellitus
  6. Strengthens the fetus in pregnant women
  7. Promotes milk production in lactating women
  8. Relieves menopausal symptoms
  9. Helps with menstrual cramps and bloating
  10. Helps break down kidney stones
  11. Reduces hypertension
  12. Helps with respiratory tract disease
  13. Supports the kidneys
  14. Helps asthma sufferers
  15. Stops bleeding
  16. Reduces inflammation
  17. Reduces incident of prostate cancer
  18. Minimizes skin problems
  19. Eliminates allergic rhinitis
  20. Lessens nausea
  21. Cures the common cold
  22. Helps with osteoarthritis
  23. Alleviates diarrhea
  24. Helps with gastrointestinal disease, IBS, and constipation
  25. Reduces gingivitis and prevents plaque when used as a mouth wash.
  26. Has been shown to be helpful to in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease
  27. Relieves neurological disorders like MS, ALS and sciatica
  28. Destroys intestinal worms or parasites
  29. Supports the endocrine health by helping the thyroid, spleen and pancreas

You can brew stinging nettle leaves in almost boiling water and drink daily as a curative to all these ailments. Just be sure to check with your doctor since nettle can interfere with certain pharmaceuticals. Enjoy nettle tea benefits today!

Source: http://consciouslifenews.com/29-nettle-tea-benefits-sipping-nettle-tea-better-health/1161788/

Read more information on nettle tea http://www.nettletea.com/
http://www.nettletea.com/digestive-support/ nettle tea benefits to digestion
http://www.nettletea.com/anemia/ benefits of nettle tea to anemia
http://www.nettletea.com/lupus/ how to make nettle tea for lupus

Chaga Mushroon as a Potent Immune Enhancing Fungus

Recently my wife and I were walking in the woods when I spotted a rotting birch tree. All over the decaying trunk were clusters of a gnarly black growth, which I quickly recognized as chaga (Inonotus obliquus). Relatively unused in the west, chaga is a potent immune enhancing agent that is highly popular in Russia and parts of Europe, and it enjoys a major body of science for its health benefits.

Unlike most fungus, chaga is hard and woody, bearing no resemblance to mushrooms. Instead, it looks more like a cracked piece of burned charcoal. Chaga’s black color is due to a concentration of melanin, the same pigment that colors human skin. Because chaga can be used to start fires, it is also known as the “tinder fungus.”

The name chaga derives from the Komi-Permyak language of Russia’s Kama River Basin, where the fungus has played a role in traditional medicine for centuries. Chaga can be found throughout northern Asia and in Canada, Norway, northern and eastern Europe and northern parts of the United Sates.

Chaga is rich in natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory phenols, containing the compounds betulin and betulinic acid – which derive directly from host birch trees. Both betulin and betulinic acid demonstrate anti-tumor effects, which explain why chaga is known as an anti-cancer agent. Additionally, some science shows that betulin can play a beneficial role in controlling metabolic disorders, such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. A group of compounds in chaga called lanostanoids also appear to play significant anti-cancer roles.

The exact anti-cancer activity of chaga is not completely understood, but some compounds in the fungus boost immune activity, some specifically prevent cancer cells from replicating, and others cause premature cancer cell death. This argues for the utilization of a whole chaga extract, rather than isolating a single compound. In chaga, many agents appear to be active against cancer.

One of the most surprising benefits of chaga is in regards to psoriasis. In one Russian study, psoriasis patients who took chaga recovered from their condition. Given that psoriasis is notoriously difficult to treat and responds to very little therpaies, this effect alone could be of enormous benefit to many.

The compound ergosterol in chaga, along with related agents, shows anti-inflammatory activity. This may account for why chaga is thought of as a life-extending agent in China, as inflammation is part of every chronic, degenerative disease. Reducing systemic inflammation can mitigate or help prevent a variety of health problems, leading to a healthier life – and presumably a longer one.

Traditionally, chaga has been used for a variety of purposes. Scientific investigation chaga’s use as an anti-allergy agent shows that in animals, the fungus has the ability to prevent anaphylactic shock – a serious and potentially fatal consequence of a severe allergy. In another study, administration of an extract of chaga reduced infection due to the Herpes simplex virus.

In a cell study, chaga showed potent activity against the hepatitis C virus. Whether this same activity will prove true in living humans remains to be seen, but if it does, then chaga will benefit thousands of people who often suffer for many years with this crippling disease.

Source: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/05/29/chaga-potent-immune-enhancing-fungus.html

Additional information on chaga tea http://www.chagatea.org/
http://www.chagatea.org/chaga-tea-antioxidants/ benefits of chaga tea recipe
http://www.chagatea.org/chaga-tea-immune-support/ how to make chaga tea for immune health
http://www.chagatea.org/chaga-tea-wildcraft/ benefits of wild chaga tea

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

The Weight Loss Benefits of Damiana Tea

What is Damiana?

Damiana, or turnera diffusa, is a flowering shrub found throughout Mexico, the West Indies, and parts of Central and South America. The leaves have historically been used as traditional herbal therapies for tonic and cleansing purposes. Indigenous people in Central and South America have used the leaves to make a tea, which is believed to have relaxing and aphrodisiac effects.

Currently, the “Physicians’ Desk Reference for Herbal Medicines,” recognizes damiana leaf as an herbal supplement that may be helpful for boosting libido, relaxation, and weight loss.

How Does Damiana Work?

Damiana has a complex chemical makeup, its known compounds include α-pinene, β-carotene, β-pinene, eucalyptol, tannins and thymol. The compound damianin, a chemical essential to the plant’s structure, has been shown to produce a relaxing effect on the central nervous system. Damiana has also been shown to have a hypoglycemic effect, prompting discussion about its potential for diabetic and weight loss therapies.

It is believed that damiana may function as an aromatase inhibitor. A 2008 study by the School of Pharmacy at the University of Mississippi investigated the anti-aromatase and estrogenic activity of damiana. Compounds isolated from the leaves were evaluated for aromatase activity using a tritiated-water release assay and for estrogenic activity using yeast estrogen screen assay. Damiana extract, and the extracted compounds pinocembrin and acacetin lessened aromatase activity. Other compounds, Apigenin 7-glucoside, Z-echinacin and pinocembrin showed estrogenic activity.

Damiana For Weight Loss

Damiana encourages loose stools, which may help promote internal cleansing. However, damiana has gained the most attention when used with other plants to produce thermogenic activity.

A 2001 Denmark study noted that, when combined with guarana and yerba mate, the combination produces thermogenic effects with appetite suppression. Over a span of 45 days, overweight participants were given YGD in capsule form before a main meal. The study concluded that the combination significantly delayed gastric emptying, reduced the time in which participants “felt full” and produced significant weight loss.

Furthermore, the mood enhancing effects, combined with the appetite suppressant effects, of damiana may lead to situational improvement of conditions that predicate to overeating, particularly persons who eat for emotional comfort.

The efficacy of damiana for mood and thermogenic response has resulted in multiple patents being filed for oral appetite suppressant supplements that contain damiana.

Damiana is widely available in health food and supplement stores in a variety of delivery methods that include tea blends, capsules, extracts, tablets, and tinctures. Damiana has shown to be most effective when used with other plants and herbs for sexual potency, weight loss, mood, and normal systemic function.


Zhao J, Dasmahapatra AK, Khan SI, Khan IA. Anti-aromatase activity of the constituents from damiana (Turnera diffusa). J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Dec 8;120(3):387-93. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2008.09.016. Epub 2008 Sep 26.
Andersen T, Fogh J. Weight loss and delayed gastric emptying following a South American herbal preparation in overweight patients. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2001 Jun;14(3):243-50.
Kumar S, Madaan R, Sharma A. Estimation of Apigenin, an Anxiolytic Constituent, in Turnera aphrodisiaca. Indian J Pharm Sci. 2008 Nov;70(6):847-51. doi: 10.4103/0250-474X.49143.
Kumar S, Sharma A. Anti-anxiety Activity Studies on Homoeopathic Formulations of Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2005 Mar;2(1):117-119.

Additional information on damiana tea http://www.damianatea.net/
http://www.damianatea.net/antioxidants-in-damiana-tea/ damiana tea antioxidants
http://www.damianatea.net/bleach-free-tea-bags/ health benefits of bleach-free damiana tea bags
http://www.damianatea.net/damiana-tea-as-an-aphrodisiac/ damiana tea benefits to libido

14 Uses For Calendula Tea

Calendula is loaded with powerful skin-healing, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, yet is gentle enough for most people and animals to use safely.

This week, on the blog, I’ll be sharing recipes and projects that you can make with calendula flowers and then we’ll wrap it up around Thursday with a free little eBook that you can download to your computer for easy reference.

The majority of the projects can be made with either fresh or dried flowers. I grow most of my own calendula (Baker Creek Heirloom is an excellent place to buy seeds), but occasionally supplement my supply with high quality flowers purchased from Mountain Rose Herbs or Bulk Herb Store. (affiliate links)

Quick overview of how to make calendula tea:

  • Boiling water method with dried flowers: Place around a tablespoon of dried calendula flowers in a heat proof mug and pour boiling water over them. Cover with a saucer and let steep for around 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Boiling water method with fresh flowers: Fill a heat-proof jar with fresh flowers and pour boiling water over them. Cap and let infuse until the tea is cool enough to drink.
  • Sun tea method: Fill a jar with fresh flowers (or 1/4 full with dried flowers) and cover with water. Cap and place out in the sun for at least 5 or 6 hours.
  • Once your tea has finished infusing, you’ll want to strain it before proceeding to the next steps. (The remaining petals can be composted.) Make small batches at a time and store any leftover tea in your refrigerator. Water infusions have a fairly short shelf life, so discard the remainder after a day or two.
  • Important note: Calendula can stimulate menstruation, so pregnant women (or animals) should not use it internally. Also, if you’re on medications, have chronic health issues, or just questions in general, check with a qualified professional before self-treating with home remedies.

Here are 14 uses for calendula tea:

  1. Use as a gargle for sore throat.
  2. Use as a mouth rinse to help relieve blisters, inflamed gums or thrush.
  3. Dip small cloths or clean rags into the tea and apply as a compress to scraped, itchy, scratched or otherwise inflamed skin conditions.
  4. Use with homemade baby wipes to help alleviate diaper rash.
  5. Strain through a coffee filter and use as an eye rinse for itchy eyes due to allergies, dryness and viral pink-eye.
  6. Wash your face with calendula tea nightly, if prone to acne and breakouts.
  7. Pour some in a foot bath, for fungal conditions such as athlete’s foot.
  8. Add some to your regular bath to help soothe and heal inflamed skin or rashes.
  9. Use as a hair rinse, after shampooing, to alleviate itchy scalp conditions.
  10. Pour into a small spray bottle to make a disinfecting wound spray.
  11. Drinking calendula tea is reported to help heal gastric ulcers, congested lymph nodes and sore throat. It can potentially help break a fever by causing a sweat. Dosage is no more than 2 to 3 cups per day.
  12. Make Calendula Ice. (Freeze tea in ice cube trays. Once frozen, remove from tray and store in single layers in labeled freezer bags. Rub a cube over rashes, scrapes, or other general boo-boos as needed.)
  13. Calendula tea can safely be used on most non-pregnant animals including: dogs, cats, horses, cows, rabbits, goats, chickens and ducks. It can be used as a soothing rinse for flea bites, eczema, scratches, scrapes, itchy coats or to help cleanse and heal minor wounds.
  14. For dogs prone to hot spots or other raw areas, calendula tea can be gently dabbed or spritzed on the area. This works fantastically on my little old albino dog, who frequently gets a chapped and sunburnt nose just from being outside a short while.
Source: http://thenerdyfarmwife.com/14-uses-for-calendula-tea/

Additional information on calendula tea http://www.calendulatea.net/
http://www.calendulatea.net/detoxification/ calendula tea recipe for detox
http://www.calendulatea.net/indigestion/ how to make calendula tea for indigestion
http://www.calendulatea.net/menstrual-cramps/ calendula tea benefits to menstrual cramps

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

How Parsley Tea Cleared Up My Skin

It wasn’t until I turned 30 that I started using makeup — and even then it was mainly because my upper lip, cheekbones and chin were covered in blemishes. But the worst was a butterfly-shaped mark that covered my forehead. It looked like a pregnancy mask. Only I was not pregnant.

I tried every possible treatment and remedy: aromatherapy, crystal scrubs, whitening formulas, you name it! Once I even rubbed onion all over my face because my grandmother said it might help. Then every time I ran, swam or cycled in the sun, the marks got darker.

Then one day, a holistic practitioner asked if I had ever tried parsley tea. Blemishes can be a sign of liver malfunction, she explained, and parsley is great for detoxing the kidneys and liver.

As usual, I did my homework and learned that parsley contains immune-enhancing vitamins (C and A) and is a powerful antioxidant. In fact, many spas use parsley for skin treatments because vitamin C not only nourishes the skin, it reduces scars and blemishes and stimulates the production of collagen, which is the key to cell reproduction and repair. Bingo!

Flat leaf (Italian) parsley is more fragrant and less bitter than the curly leafed kind, so for the next 30 days I brewed up some parsley tea twice daily, before breakfast and dinner. I bought it in bulk every week. My routine:
  • Soak parsley in water with a splash of vinegar.
  • Wrap in a towel and store in the fridge.
  • Bring a small saucepan of filtered water to a boil.
  • Put ¼ cup of parsley in a cup or teapot.
  • Pour the boiling water on top, let steep for 5-6 minutes.
  • Splash of fresh lemon (optional).
  • After a month and many cups of parsley tea (always brewed fresh, to preserve vitamins and minerals), my face was spotless. Twelve years on, it still is — even though now I only drink parsley tea occasionally.
Source: http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-12196/how-parsley-tea-cleared-up-my-skin.html

For additional information on parsley tea http://www.parsleytea.net/
http://www.parsleytea.net/gout/ how to make parsley tea for gout
http://www.parsleytea.net/parsley-tea-for-kidney-cleanse/ parsley tea benefits to kidney health
http://www.parsleytea.net/bleach-free-tea-bags/ benefits of bleach-free parsley tea bags

Top 10 Health Benefits of Bitter Melon (Gourd) and How to Make its Juice

Bitter melon, also known as bitter gourd or balsam pear, is commonly grown in tropical areas and used as a food as well as a medicine.

It belongs to the gourd family and has a warty texture. It tastes very bitter. In fact, it is the most bitter among all edible vegetables.

The pods can be light to dark green in color and have oblong or oval shapes with a pointed tip at the blossom end. The inner flesh is white with rough-edged seeds. The seeds turn red when ripe.

The nutritional value of this vegetable includes protein, carbohydrates, calcium, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, folate, vitamins A, C and several B vitamins.

It also contains a good amount of dietary fiber and is low in calories. It also has linolenic acid (an essential, omega-6 fatty acid) and oleic acid (an unsaturated fat).

Bitter melon is used in cooking for its bitter flavor, usually in stir-fries, soups and curries. You can even brew tea from the fruit, leaves and stems of the plant or drink bitter melon juice.

Steps to make bitter melon juice
  • Wash 1 or 2 medium-size bitter melons under cold running water.
  • Slice them down the center with a sharp knife, then scoop out the seeds and white flesh with a spoon.
  • Cut the green flesh of the melon into small pieces.
  • Soak the pieces in a glass of water for 20 to 30 minutes.
  • Blend the soaked bitter pieces along with the water.
  • Strain the juice to remove any solid pieces.
  • Add honey, black pepper powder, lemon juice or ginger juice for taste.

Controls Diabetes

Bitter melon helps control diabetes due to its blood glucose-lowering effect. It has three active substances with anti-diabetic properties, including charantin, vicine and polypeptide-p.

It helps increase pancreatic insulin secretion and prevents insulin resistance, making it beneficial for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics.

According to a 2011 study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, a 2,000 mg daily dose of bitter melon significantly reduced blood glucose levels among people with Type 2 diabetes. However, the hypoglycemic effect was less than that found with a 1,000 mg/day dose of metformin.

Drink ½ to 1 cup of bitter gourd juice on an empty stomach each morning.
You should also include one dish made with bitter gourd daily in your diet.
Note: Do not forget to take your diabetes medications as directed by your doctor. Also, keep monitoring your blood sugar level.
Purifies Blood

Bitter melon also works as a natural blood purifier. Impure blood can cause symptoms like constant headaches, allergies, fatigue and weakened immunity.

Bitter melon helps in cleansing or detoxifying impurities in the blood. This helps in the treatment of blood disorders like blood boils and itching due to toxemia. It even imparts a “glowing” effect on the skin and keeps the skin free from problems like acne, psoriasis and eczema.

Add a little lemon juice and honey to a glass of fresh bitter melon juice. Sip it slowly on an empty stomach daily for six months.

Source: http://www.top10homeremedies.com/kitchen-ingredients/top-10-health-benefits-of-bitter-melon.html 

Addition information on ginger root tea http://www.gingerroottea.net/
http://www.gingerroottea.net/Colon-Cancer/ how to make ginger root tea for colon cancer
http://www.gingerroottea.net/Arthritis/ ginger root tea recipe for arthritis
http://www.gingerroottea.net/Ginger-Root-Tea-Benefits/ ginger root tea benefits

Monday, November 23, 2015

A Healthy Reishi Mushroom Tea Recipe

The practice of drinking reishi mushroom tea has existed for years, and it's still one of the best ways to reap the benefits of this medicinal mushroom.

The reishi mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum and other species) is a polypore that is cultivated on logs or woodchip beds. Although softer when fresh, it becomes quite hard when dried. This is due to the presence of chitin, a carbohydrate that helps makes up the cell walls of fungi.

How does this affect your mushroom tea? It means that dried reishi is tough, with some of the medicinal molecules locked up in the indigestible chitin. So we're going to need a long hot water extract to get these molecules out, far longer than you would brew a traditional tea.

The benefits of this tea come from water-soluble polysaccharides known as beta-glucans. These molecules are thought to:

  • Stimulate the immune system to fight infection and foreign cells
  • Inhibit tumor growth
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Stabilize blood sugar

For this recipe I recommend buying your dried reishi mushrooms from Mountain Rose Herbs! Read my review of the company here.


  • Dried reishi mushrooms
  • Water
  • Pretty simple. The amounts are up to you. A standard reishi recommendation is 3 - 5 grams a day, although doses up to 15 grams are not uncommon for more serious illnesses.
  • If you don't have a scale, know that 3 grams is about 1 heaping tablespoon of broken or ground reishi pieces.

The amount of water is your choice as well. It all depends on how many cups of tea you want to drink. I use about 4 - 5 cups of water for every 3 - 5 grams of reishi (you can see how exact I am about this). This will boil down to a fraction of the original amount.


dried reishi mushroomsSmaller pieces are better for a hot water extraction. That said, have you ever tried to pulverize Ganoderma lucidum? I once broke a coffee grinder blade trying to break one apart!

Use whatever you have to break them into pieces. If you have an appliance that will grind them, that's great. Otherwise you can try to cut with a heavy blade or break apart pieces with your hands. If this is all too much work you can still use a whole dried mushroom per pot of water.

An easy solution is to buy a pre-sliced bag of dried reishi. This will save you the trouble of having to break them apart.

- See more at: http://www.mushroom-appreciation.com/mushroom-tea.html#sthash.p6AUCmZQ.dpuf

For additional information on reishi mushroom tea http://www.reishimushroomtea.com/
http://www.reishimushroomtea.com/reishi-mushroom-tea-for-cholesterol/ how to make reishi mushroom tea for cholesterol
http://www.reishimushroomtea.com/reishi-mushroom-tea-for-liver-health/ reishi mushroom tea recipe for liver health
http://www.reishimushroomtea.com/reishi-mushroom-tea-for-immunity/ reishi mushroom tea benefits to immunity

What is Valerian Tea Good For?

What is Valerian Tea?

Valerian is a plant native to Europe and Asia. It grows to up to four feet high and has trumpet-shaped flowers. The roots are used medicinally. Although the fresh root is relatively odorless, the dried root has a strong odor that many find unpleasant.

Valerian is believed to have been used since at least the time of ancient Greece and Rome. It was used as a folk remedy for a variety of conditions such as sleeping problems, digestive complaints, nervousness, trembling, tension headaches and heart palpitations.

Valerian's popularity waned with the introduction of prescription sleep medication.

There is no consensus on the active constituents of valerian. It's possible that valerian's activity may result from a combination of compounds rather than any one. Valerian appears to increase the body's available supply of the neurotransmitter gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), possibly by increasing its production, decreasing its absorption or slowing its breakdown.

Valerian can be found in capsule, tea, tablet or liquid extract forms in most health food stores, some drugstores and online.

Other names for valerian include All-heal, Amantilla, Setwall, Setewale, Capon's Tail, and Valeriana officinalis.

Uses for Valerian Tea

So far, scientific support for the potential benefits of valerian is fairly lacking.

1) Insomnia

The use of valerian is supported by some evidence from clinical studies. The problem with many of the studies, however, is they've generally been small, used different amounts of valerian for varying lengths of time, or had problems with the study design, making it impossible to form a conclusion about the effectiveness of valerian.

Valerian appears to be less effective than prescription sleep medication.

One possible advantage of valerian, however, is that it may not have as much of a "hangover" effect on mental or physical functioning the following day. Also, people taking sleeping pills sometimes have a temporary worsening of insomnia when they are discontinued, an effect that hasn't been reported with valerian.

2) Anxiety

Valerian is also used for anxiety, although there's insufficient evidence that it's effective.


People taking medications for insomnia or anxiety, such as benzodiazepines, should not combine these medications with valerian.

Side effects of valerian may include headache, dizziness, itchiness, upset stomach, drowsiness during the daytime, dry mouth and vivid dreams.

Rarely, liver damage has been associated with the use of valerian. It's not certain whether the cause of the liver damage was due to valerian itself or to contaminants in the product. Until we know more, people should use valerian only under the supervision of a qualified health care practitioner and those with liver disease should avoid it. Although liver damage doesn't always produce noticeable symptoms, if excessive tiredness, intense itching, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, pain or discomfort in the upper right side of the abdomen, or a yellowing of the whites of the eyes or skin occurs, see your doctor immediately.

Valerian may cause excessive sleepiness or daytime drowsiness if combined with other drugs that cause drowsiness, such as the benzodiazepines Ativan (lorazepam) or Valium (diazepam), some antidepressants, narcotics such as codeine, and barbituates such as phenobarbitol, or with over-the-counter sleep and cold products containing diphenhydramine and doxylamine.

It may also cause excessive sleepiness if taken with herbs thought to have a sedative effect, such as hops, catnip and kava.

Valerian is broken down in the liver. Theoretically, it could interfere with the effectiveness of medications that are broken down by the same liver enzymes, such as:

  • allergy medications like fexofenadine
  • cholesterol medication such as lovastatin
  • antifungal drugs such as itraconazole and ketoconazole
  • cancer medications such as irinotecan, etoposide, STI571, paclitaxel, vinblastine or vincristine
Valerian supplements haven't been tested for safety and keep in mind that the safety of supplements in pregnant women, nursing mothers, children, and those with medical conditions or who are taking medications has not been established. You can get tips on using supplements here, but if you're considering the use of valerian, talk with your primary care provider first.

Sources: http://altmedicine.about.com/cs/herbsvitaminsrz/a/Valerian.htm

Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J, eds.: Valerian root. In: Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications, 2000: 394-400.

Read more information about valerian tea http://www.valeriantea.org/
http://www.valeriantea.org/Buy-Valerian-Tea/ where to buy valerian tea
http://www.valeriantea.org/Valerian-Tea-Benefits/ valerian tea benefits
http://www.valeriantea.org/Valium/ valerian tea for anxiety

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Lower Blood Pressure Naturally With Hibiscus Tea

Recent studies show that hibiscus tea can lower blood pressure as effectively as some standard hypertension drugs can. Hibiscus is widely consumed around the world as a ruby-colored, lemony beverage (it’s the main ingredient in Red Zinger tea).

Hibiscus is safe and, unlike most blood pressure drugs, rarely causes side effects. Plus, hibiscus plants can be grown in much of the United States, so you can actually grow your own blood pressure medicine.

Hibiscus (Hibiscus sabdariffa) has been used to treat high blood pressure in both African and Asian traditional medicine. In 1996, researchers in Nigeria confirmed this age-old wisdom by showing that hibiscus flowers reduced blood pressure in laboratory animals. Soon after, researchers in Iran showed the same benefit in people. After measuring the blood pressure of 54 hypertensive adults, the researchers gave them 10 ounces of either black tea or hibiscus tea for 12 days. Average blood pressure decreased slightly in the black tea group, but decreased a significant 10 percent in the hibiscus group.

Since then, several additional studies have confirmed this effect, including two that tested hibiscus head-to-head against standard blood pressure medications:

Scientists in Mexico gave 75 hypertensive adults either captopril (Capoten; 25 milligrams twice a day) or hibiscus tea (brewed from 10 grams of crushed dried flowers — about 5 teaspoons per 1 to 2 cups water — once a day). After four weeks, the herb had worked as well as the drug, with both groups showing an 11 percent drop in blood pressure. In another study, the same researchers gave 193 people either lisinopril, (Zestril, Prinivil; 10 milligrams per day) or hibiscus (250 milligrams in the form of a capsule). After four weeks, the herb had worked almost as well as the drug: Blood pressure decreased 15 percent among those on the drug, and 12 percent among those taking hibiscus.

How does hibiscus lower blood pressure? Recent research suggests a combination of reasons: It has diuretic properties, it opens the arteries, and it appears to act as a natural angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, which means it slows the release of hormones that constrict blood vessels. In addition, hibiscus boosts immune function and provides valuable antioxidants.

Dose recommendations vary from about 1 teaspoon of dried “flowers” (technically, the calyxes surrounding the flowers) per cup of boiling water up to the 5 teaspoons used in one of the Mexican studies. Steep five to 10 minutes. If you have high blood pressure, you should own a home blood pressure monitor. Take readings before different doses and retest an hour later to see what works best for you. Check with your doctor prior to taking hibiscus if you’re currently on medication to lower blood pressure — often a combination of an herb and a lower dose of a pharmaceutical provides the same benefit.

Source: http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/herbal-remedies/lower-blood-pressure-naturally-zmgz11zrog.aspx

Learn more about hibiscus tea http://www.hibiscusteabenefits.net/
http://www.hibiscusteabenefits.net/health-benefits/ hibiscus tea benefits
http://www.hibiscusteabenefits.net/blood-pressure/ benefits of hibiscus tea to blood pressure
http://www.hibiscusteabenefits.net/weight-loss/ how to make hibiscus tea for weight loss

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Spearmint Tea Benefits

Spearmint, also simply called mint, is in the same family as peppermint but is a different species. According to the Natural Standard website, spearmint has been used in traditional medicine for centuries.

Ayurveda, which is India's traditional medical system, acknowledges spearmint for its ability to soothe colic in infants, reduce nausea and help relieve other gastrointestinal issues such as flatulence, stomach aches and irritable bowel syndrome. No side effects to spearmint have been discovered. But it's always smart to consult with your doctor before taking any herb if you're pregnant, breast-feeding or on medication.

Remedy for Nausea

Spearmint is considered an anti-emetic herb, which means it works to lessen or alleviate nausea and vomiting. Ayurveda promotes it as a remedy for vomiting during pregnancy. In a study published in "Ecancermedicalscience" in 2013, scientists looked at the effect of spearmint on nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy patients. Compared to the placebo group, patients administered spearmint oil experienced significantly less nausea and vomiting within 24 hours after consumption. There were no side effects to the spearmint oil, leading the scientists to conclude it's both safe and effective.

Hirsutism Remedy

Hirsutism is the condition of a woman having a large amount of dark, coarse hair on unwanted places, such as above the lips, on the chin and on the chest and back. It's caused by having higher levels of male sex hormones, which can be caused by certain medical conditions and drugs. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends drinking 2 cups or spearmint tea a day to treat hirsutism. In a study published in "Phytotherapy Research" in 2007, 12 women with hirsutism were given 1 cup of spearmint tea twice a day for five days. By the end of the study, their levels of male sex hormones had decreased and female hormones increased. The scientists concluded that spearmint could be used to treat mild cases of hirsutism.

It May Kill Bacteria

In a study published in "Microbios" in 2001, scientists looked at the effect of spearmint oil on various types of pathogenic bacteria, including E. coli and salmonella, in test tubes. They found that the spearmint oil inhibited growth of all bacterial strains they tested for. The larger the amount of spearmint oil was applied, the larger effect it had on inhibiting the growth of the pathogens. The scientists concluded spearmint has an antibacterial effect. Spearmint is commonly associated with cleanliness, which is why it's used in mouthwashes, soaps and other products for cleaning. The antibacterial effect of spearmint tea in the human body has not been confirmed, however.

It May Reduce Inflammation In a study published in the Chinese medical journal "Zhejiang Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban" in 2008, scientists investigated the effects of spearmint oil on inflammation in rats. Rats induced with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were given spearmint oil daily for three weeks. By the end of the study, the scientists found that destruction of lung tissue diminished. They concluded the spearmint oil had a protective mechanism and decreased lung inflammation and oxidation. The effect of spearmint tea on inflammation in humans has not been determined.

Source: http://www.livestrong.com/article/338231-spearmint-tea-benefits/

Learn more about spearmint tea benefits http://www.spearminttea.net/

How to Harvest & Preserve Red Raspberry Leaf Tea

When I planted raspberries (Rubus idaeus) on the property back in 2010 it was for the delicious fruit. It was years later while researching natural remedies to ease my menstrual symptoms that I discovered that red raspberry leaf tea is a natural remedy for conditions involving the uterus, including menstrual support and menopause (Native American Medicinal Plants).

Red raspberry leaves have also been used as medicine for centuries for pregnancy and childbirth, astringent for skin irritations, gargle for sore throats, and for diarrhea. Raspberry leaf tea has no known side effects or drug interactions, but it can lower blood sugar and impede with the absorption of some vitamins (Healing Herbs A to Z).

It is not known precisely why Raspberry Leaf tea is so effective for uterine health. Herbalists believe that the presence of tannins and the alkaloid fragarine combined with other nutrients, including calcium, iron, phosphorus, potassium, and vitamin B, C, and E help tone and relax the pelvic and uterine muscles (Herbal Healing for Women).

After researching, I felt pretty confident in trying red raspberry leaf tea for my menstrual discomforts, and I had plenty of access to leaves to harvest. After drinking raspberry tea for several months, it relieved a lot of my symptoms, including headache, cramps, and overall energy level and moodiness during that time of the month.

I wasn’t completely convinced until I casually remarked to Kevin that I thought the raspberry leaf tea was helping. The next thing I knew, he was outside in the raspberry patch harvesting more raspberry leaves for me to use. Hmmm….

How to Harvest Raspberry Leaves

Collect raspberry leaves before the plant blooms. Harvest mid-morning after the dew has evaporated and before it the sun is hot to preserve the oils and flavor. Wear gloves and long sleeves to protect yourself from the thorns. Select young, healthy leaves that have not been treated with chemicals and clip them from the cane.

I grow Heritage Raspberries, an everbearing variety that produces two crops each season, a light crop in July followed by a heavy crop in fall. I allow the canes to begin leafing out before pruning the raspberry patch in the spring. I cut whole canes and trim the young leaves off into a bowl as I prune.

How to Dry Raspberry Leaves

Wash leaves and drain or pat dry. Spread the leaves out on a screen and allow them to dry naturally away from dust and sunlight. Or you can gather the leaves by their stems, tie the ends, and hang them to dry. Depending on the humidity, drying usually takes 1-2 weeks. The quickest way to dry Raspberry Leaves is by using a dehydrator. Spread the leaves out on the screens and dry at a low temperature. Check every 30-minutes until completely dry. You can tell when the leaves are dry, by crushing a leaf or two. It should crumble easily. Once dry, store leaves lightly packed in a glass jar away from direct sunlight. Try not to crush them to reserve the flavor until you are ready to brew your tea.

How to Make Red Raspberry Leaf Tea

Raspberry Leaf Tea tastes like a mild green tea, but without the caffeine. To make tea, use about 1-teaspoon of crushed, dried raspberry leaves per 8-ounce cup of boiling water. Steep for at least 5 minutes and drink like regular tea.

Source: http://growagoodlife.com/red-raspberry-leaf/

Learn more about raspberry leaf tea http://www.raspberryleaftea.org/
http://www.raspberryleaftea.org/Raspberry-Leaf-Tea-Benefits/ raspberry leaf tea pregnancy

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Is Fenugreek Seed Tea Safe to Drink?

Fenugreek, a kitchen spice and primary ingredient in pickles, is an ancient herb. Egyptian texts attest to its use as early as 1500 B.C. Fenugreek seeds, sometimes taken in the form of a tea, have traditionally been used to treat digestive disorders and menstrual cramps. Herbalists today are likely to advise fenugreek to treat diabetes and high cholesterol. Although human clinical trials are limited, laboratory and animal research supports fenugreek's ability to lower blood sugar and cholesterol. Consult your doctor before using fenugreek.


Fenugreek, botanically known as Trigonella foenum-graecum and also called methi in Ayurveda, features grayish-green toothed leaves and pale yellow or whitish flowers that develop into seed pods. The yellow-brown seeds within are dried to produce the spice. Fenugreek has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat kidney problems, arthritis and digestive problems; it has also been employed in folk medicine as a diuretic and anti-inflammatory and in poultices to treat boils and swelling. Fenugreek seeds were one of the original ingredients in Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, a 19th century patent medicine marketed to treat menstrual cramps and menopause symptoms. The seeds, which have a rich, sweet taste, are also used in maple flavoring.

Constituents and Effects

Fenugreek seeds contain a group of glycoside steroidal saponins known as graecunins, as well as the compounds diosgenin and fenugrin B and an alkaloid known as trigonelline. The seeds are rich in protein and mucilagenous fiber. Also present in fenugreek seeds are coumarin compounds, galactomannans and the amino acids lysine and L-tryptophan.

Drugs.com, which provides peer-reviewed medical information to consumers, reports that fenugreek's high levels of polyphenolic flavonoids give it antioxidant properties in test tubes. Blue Shield Complementary and Alternative Health credits the steroidal saponins in fenugreek with the ability to inhibit both the absorption of cholesterol in the intestines and its production by the liver. The seeds' high levels of soluble fiber help to reduce blood sugar by slowing down carbohydrate digestion and absorption. Fenugreek may also have the ability to lower triglycerides.


Scientific research supports the protective and antioxidant effects of polyphenols in fenugreek seeds. In a laboratory study published in 2004 in "Plant Foods and Human Nutrition," researchers found that fenugreek seed extracts protected human red blood cells from oxidative damage, supporting the seeds' potent antioxidant properties. Researchers credited the gallic acid in the seed extract with the beneficial effect.

Usage and Considerations

You can brew fenugreek tea by adding 1 tbsp. of fenugreek seeds to 1 cup of boiling water. Fenugreektea.org advises letting the mixture steep for 45 minutes to unleash the full beneficial effect of the seeds, then straining, cooling and drinking it after meals to help with digestion. Fenugreek is generally recognized as safe when used as a food. Mild diarrhea and gas may accompany its use. BSCAH notes that this side effect almost invariably resolves after using fenugreek seeds or tea for a few days. Rare allergic reactions have been reported with fenugreek. Traditionally used to hasten delivery, fenugreek can cause uterine contractions; don't use it if you are pregnant. Fenugreek seeds and tea can interact with prescription drugs, and may increase the effects of anticoagulants such as warfarin. Consult your doctor before using fenugreek.

Source: http://www.livestrong.com/article/486134-is-fenugreek-seed-tea-safe-to-drink/

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Monday, November 16, 2015

Nettle Tea Benefits

Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) grows wild in temperate regions around the world. A staple among herbalists, stinging nettle is considered a classic “nutritive” herb, meaning it is very nutrient dense and nourishing. Nettle has been used as food, medicine, and a nourishing tonic since ancient times.

Urtica comes from the Latin urere, meaning "to burn," because of its erect, bristly hairs covering the leaves and stem which sting when touched. These stinging hairs, along with the leaves’ sharply serrated edges, are distinguishing features of stinging nettle.

Infusing a large amount of dried stinging nettle leaves in water for a long period of time is one of the easiest and most traditional ways to obtain nettle tea benefits.

Nettle’s Nutrients

Stinging nettle is packed with vitamins, minerals, and trace minerals along with hefty dose of potent phytonutrients including deep-green chlorophyll and carotenoids.[2,3] In fact, more than 100 chemical components have been identified in nettle, including:

• Minerals – iron, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, copper, boron, strontium
• Vitamins - A, C, K, and B vitamins
• Phytonutrients - chlorophyll, beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin,[4] quercetin, rutin

Packed with Minerals

Nettle tea, made from dried nettle leaves, is perhaps best known for its high mineral content. The leaves are packed with more minerals, especially magnesium and calcium, than a number of other medicinal herbs.[6] One recent study found that dried nettle leaf has more magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, boron, and strontium than dried chamomile, peppermint, sage, St. John’s wort, linden, and lemon balm.

The exact amounts of various minerals extracted from the leaves into the tea depends on many factors, including the plant’s growing conditions, the type of mineral, the amount of dried nettle leaves and water used when preparing the tea, and the steeping time. One recent study found that 500 mL (about one quart) of tea made with 20 grams (about 0.7 ounces) of dried nettle leaves, steeped for 30 minutes, contains 76 mg of magnesium, which represents about 20-25% of men’s and women’s daily requirement, respectively.[6] This may not sound like much, but it’s quite remarkable for a beverage. Furthermore, most Western herbalists recommend a slightly higher tea to water ratio and longer steeping times than those used in this study in order to potentially increase the mineral content even more. This is discussed more below; first, let’s take a look at some of nettle tea’s other numerous health benefits.

Other Nettle Tea Benefits

In addition to its high nutrient content, results from preliminary studies show that stinging nettle has many other health-promoting properties. For example, nettle has been shown to:

• Decrease oxidative stress. The natural polyphenols in nettle leaves are thought to be responsible the powerful antioxidant abilities of nettle tea. Oxidative stress is implicated in accelerated aging as well as many chronic diseases.
• Relieve pain. Nettle tea has analgesic effects.
• Fight infections. Nettles have antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal effects. Nettle tea has notable antimicrobial activity against gram-positive and -negative bacteria when compared with standard and strong antimicrobial compounds.
• Decrease inflammation. Nettles work as a natural anti-inflammatory through a number of different mechanisms, such as decreasing nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) binding activity to DNA. Nettle extract, used to treat arthritis, has been shown to decrease levels of pro-inflammatory compounds such as interleukin-6 and • C-reactive protein.
• Lower blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Nettles are used in diabetics to combat high blood sugar and cardiovascular risk factors.
• Fight cancer. Nettles have a beneficial effect in prostate cancer.
• Heal stomach lining. Nettle tea helps heal the mucosal lining of the stomach in the case of ulcers or stomach irritation.
• Treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Nettle roots instead of the leaves are used to decrease symptoms of enlarged prostate.
• One of the best ways to obtain nettle tea benefits is by steeping a hefty amount of the dried, cut leaves in boiling water inside a large, covered container for a long period of time.
A general guideline for making mineral-rich infusions with nutritive herbs like nettle is to use one ounce of dried herb per quart of filtered or distilled water (or about a heaping tablespoon per eight ounces water). One ounce of plant material per quart of water is generally thought necessary to provide a sufficient quantity of minerals if you drink one quart of tea daily. Consider this: an ounce of dried herb is roughly equivalent to four ounces of fresh plant and although not all the minerals are 100% extracted into the tea, this this mineral beverage is like a liquid salad.

Source: http://www.motherearthnews.com/editorial/blogs/natural%20health/nettle%20tea%20benefits%20boneup%20on%20minerals%20fight%20inflammation%20and%20more.aspx

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